Stanford Professor Bruce McCandliss found that beginning readers who focus on letter-sound relationships, or phonics, increase activity in the area of their brains best wired for reading.

 

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A study, co-authored by Professor Bruce McCandliss, provides some of the first evidence that a specific teaching strategy for reading has direct neural impact.

 

Beginning readers who focus on letter-sound relationships, or phonics, instead of trying to learn whole words, increase activity in the area of their brains best wired for reading, according to new Stanford research investigating how the brain responds to different types of reading instruction.

 

In other words, to develop reading skills, teaching students to sound outC-A-Tsparks more optimal brain circuitry than instructing them to memorize the wordCat.” And, the study found, these teaching-induced differences show upeven on future encounters with the word.

 

The study, co-authored by Stanford Professor Bruce McCandliss of the GraduateSchool of Education and the Stanford Neuroscience Institute, provides some of the first evidence that a specific teaching strategy for reading has direct neural impact.

The research could eventually lead to better-designed interventions to helpstruggling readers.

This research is exciting because it takes cognitive neuroscience and connectsit to questions that have deep meaning and history in educational research,”said McCandliss, who wrote the study with Yuliya Yoncheva, a researcher atNew York University, and Jessica Wise, a graduate student at the University ofTexas at Austin.Read more…

 

Original Article: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2015/may/reading-brain-phonics-052815.html

 

Educational Initiatives

Educational Initiatives

Founded by a group of IIMA alumni, with ample personal experience of educational institutions, Educational Initiatives (EI) is an effort to ensure every child learns with understanding.

Established in 2001, Educational Initiatives believes in making a difference in education through personalized learning and ensuring that students learn with understanding.

EI has over 15 years of expertise in education, with a deep understanding of child psychology and efficient methods of teaching, based on detailed research and a formidable database of student learning through ASSET.

Our detailed research has proven that children today respond to rote-based questions relatively well, however, they fail to answer unfamiliar or application based questions due to unclear core concepts.
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